blues

Bo Carter – Please Warm My Weiner


Armenter Chatmon (June 30, 1893 – September 21, 1964), known as Bo Carter, was an early American blues musician. He was a member of the Mississippi Sheiks in concerts and on a few of their recordings. He also managed that group, which included his brothers Lonnie Chatmon on fiddle and, occasionally, Sam Chatmon on bass and their friend Walter Vinson on guitar and lead vocals.
Since the 1960s, Carter has become best known for his bawdy songs, such as “Let Me Roll Your Lemon”, “Banana in Your Fruit Basket”, “Pin in Your Cushion”, “Your Biscuits Are Big Enough for Me”, “Please Warm My Wiener” and “My Pencil Won’t Write No More”. However, his output was not limited to dirty blues. In 1928, he recorded the original version of “Corrine, Corrina”, which later became a hit for Big Joe Turner and has become a standard in various musical genres.
Carter and his brothers (including the pianist Harry Chatmon, who also made recordings) first learned music from their father, the fiddler Henderson Chatmon, a former slave, at their home on a plantation between Bolton and Edwards, Mississippi. Their mother, Eliza, also sang and played the guitar.
Carter made his recording debut in 1928, backing Alec Johnson, and was soon was recording as a solo musician. He became one of the dominant blues recording acts of the 1930s, recording 110 sides. He also played with and managed the family group, the Mississippi Sheiks, and several other acts in the area. He and the Sheiks often performed for whites, playing the pop hits of the day and white-oriented dance music, as well as for blacks, playing a bluesier repertoire.
Carter went partly blind during the 1930s. He settled in Glen Allan, Mississippi, and despite his vision problems did some farming but also continued to play music and perform, sometimes with his brothers. He moved to Memphis, Tennessee, and worked outside the music industry in the 1940s.
Carter suffered strokes and died of a cerebral hemorrhage at Shelby County Hospital, in Memphis, on September 21, 1964.

Maggie Jones – Anybody Here Want To Try My Cabbage?


Maggie Jones was an American blues singer and pianist who recorded thirty-eight songs between 1923 and 1926. She was billed as “The Texas Nightingale”. Among her best-rememberd songs are “Single Woman’s Blues”, “Undertaker’s Blues”, and “Northbound Blues”.

Eddie Chamblee – Big Bamboo


Edwin Leon Chamblee (24 February 1920 – 1 May 1999), known as Eddie “Long Gone” Chamblee, was an American tenor and alto saxophonist, and occasional vocalist, who played jazz and R&B.
He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and grew up in Chicago where he began learning the saxophone at the age of 12. After leaving Wendell Phillips High School, he studied law at Chicago State University, playing in clubs in the evenings and at weekends. He played in US Army bands between 1941 and 1946. After leaving the army, he joined Miracle Records. He played on Sonny Thompson’s hit record “Long Gone” in 1948, and on its follow-up, “Late Freight”, credited to the Sonny Thompson Quintet featuring Eddie Chamblee. Both records reached no. 1 on the national Billboard R&B chart. Two follow-up records, “Blue Dreams” and “Back Street”, also made the R&B chart in 1949.
From 1947, he led his own band in Chicago clubs, as well as continuing to record with Thompson and on other sessions in Chicago, including The Four Blazes’ no. 1 R&B hit “Mary Jo” in 1952. In 1954 he joined Lionel Hampton’s band for two years, touring in Europe, before returning to lead his own group in Chicago. He accompanied both Amos Milburn and Lowell Fulson on some of their recordings, and then worked as accompanist to Dinah Washington on many of her successful recordings in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The two performed vocal duets in a style similar to that later adopted by Washington with Brook Benton, and were briefly married; he was her fifth husband. Chamblee also recorded for the Mercury and EmArcy labels, and with his own group in the early 1960s for the Roulette and Prestige labels.
In the 1970s he rejoined Hampton for tours of Europe, where he also played with Milt Buckner, and he recorded for the French Black & Blue label. He also performed with the Count Basie Orchestra in 1982, and from the 1980s until his death with the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band, as well as in clubs in New York City.
He died in New York in 1999 at the age of 79.

Lightnin’ Hopkins ‎– Soul Blues [Full Album]

1991 – Lightnin’ Hopkins ‎– Soul Blues (Prestige Records)

Tracklist:
01. 00:00 • I’m Going to Build Me a Heaven of My Own
02. 05:59 • My Babe
03. 09:22 • Too Many Drivers
04. 12:54 • I’m a Crawling Black Snake
05. 17:46 • Rocky Mountain Blues
06. 21:41 • I Mean Goodbye
07. 24:44 • The Howling Wolf
08. 28:39 • Black Ghost Blues
09. 32:12 • Darling, Do You Remember Me
10. 35:53 • Lonesome Graveyard

Booker T. Jones – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


Jones’ name is synonymous with the Hammond B3 organ. At 17, he recorded the instrument’s anthem, “Green Onions,” with his band Booker T and The MG’s. Watch him play the song all alone in the NPR Music offices — and with such joy, you’d swear he just discovered it.

Set List:
“Green Onions”
“Born Under A Bad Sign”
“Down In Memphis”

Gil Scott-Heron – Me And The Devil


I’m New Here is the thirteenth studio album by American soul artist Gil Scott-Heron, released February 8, 2010 on XL Recordings. It is Scott-Heron’s first album of original material in sixteen years, following a period of personal and legal troubles with drug addiction. Recording sessions for the album took place during 2007 to 2009 and production was handled by XL Recordings-owner Richard Russell. Primarily a blues and spoken-word album, I’m New Here serves as musical and lyrical departure from Scott-Heron’s previous work.
The album debuted at number 181 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling 3,700 copies in its first week. It has spawned one single, “Me and the Devil”, an adaptation of blues musician Robert Johnson’s “Me and the Devil Blues” (1937). Upon its release, I’m New Here received generally positive reviews from most music critics.

Songhoy Blues – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


The music I feel most connected to beyond rock is from Mali. The melodies are so fluid, so elegant and most of all so trance-inducing. It often sits on one chord and notes played revolve around that chord. It can feel like a drone at times, and in the case of Songhoy Blues it rocks, lulls and the percussion grooves are not only trance-inducing but dance-inducing.

Many of the musicians we know from Mali are in exile, driven out by Islamists threatening musicians and kidnapping them; the members of Tinariwen know this firsthand. There is sadness, defiance and celebration in the music Songhoy Blues brought to the Tiny Desk from a record called Music in Exile, which is co-produced by an artist most of us rock lovers know best from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Nick Zinner. Rock and the desert blues, already closely connected in attitude and sound, fuse nicely with his touch — and can be felt in blissful rawness here.

Set List
“Sekou Oumarou” 00:00
“Al Hassidi Terei” 03:46
“Soubour” 07:49