indie rock

Paul Cherry – Hey Girl

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David Candy – Diary of a Genius


David Candy is a pseudonym of Ian Svenonius (formerly of Nation of Ulysses, The Make-Up, and currently Weird War). Only one album was released under the name David Candy, Play Power. The character of David Candy was part of a series of “Magazine-Style Records” conceived by Mike Alway (produced by Jez Butler and John Austin), which included other imaginary acts such as Death by Chocolate, Maria Napoleon, Mild Euphoria and Lollipop Train.

The David Candy persona is that of a pretentious, over-opinionated, egotistical, self-absorbed, pseudo-intellectual hipster who has perhaps spent too long alone, absorbed in The Doors’ American Prayer. This choice of character traits may have been a form of self-mockery by Svenonius, or perhaps a commentary on the personalities of the indie rock scene in general. Much like the assumed personas and personalities of all of Svenonius’ bands and projects, a make-believe mythos surrounds the character of David Candy.

Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeroes – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros can’t exactly slip into an office building unnoticed: Clad in the same clothes they’d worn at a concert the night before, the L.A. band’s 10 ragtag misfits would have fit in far more seamlessly at, say, Burning Man. Seeming to exist in a blissed-out alternate universe — during the wonderful “Home,” singer Jade Castrinos exclaims, “Good morning, everybody!” as the clock behind her reads 2:10 p.m. — this is a band whose performances beg to be seen as well as heard, not to mention shot through a wide-angle lens.

The biggest band to play a Tiny Desk Concert – the 10 members of The Magnetic Zeroes played three songs from their debut album (Up From Below).

The set included:
– Janglin
– Home
– 40 Day Daydream

The Family Crest – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

There’s a decent chance you’re about to discover your favorite new band. Based in San Francisco and led by Liam McCormick, The Family Crest builds its songs from a combination of infectious enthusiasm and powerful talent. The group owes its huge sound not just to its seven members, but to the community that records and plays with them. Eighty people are credited on The Family Crest’s first album, Beneath the Brine.At the Tiny Desk, we heard from seven players with training in classical and jazz, as well as instruments including violin, cello, upright bass, flute, trombone, drums, guitar and McCormick’s voice. And what a voice: Trained as an opera singer but with a hunger for jazz, he’s one of those fortunate souls with plenty to express and the range to deliver. The three songs performed here give you a sense of what The Family Crest can do, though Beneath the Brine is what you’ll want to hear once your jaw has dropped watching this.