jazz

Eddie Chamblee – Big Bamboo


Edwin Leon Chamblee (24 February 1920 – 1 May 1999), known as Eddie “Long Gone” Chamblee, was an American tenor and alto saxophonist, and occasional vocalist, who played jazz and R&B.
He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and grew up in Chicago where he began learning the saxophone at the age of 12. After leaving Wendell Phillips High School, he studied law at Chicago State University, playing in clubs in the evenings and at weekends. He played in US Army bands between 1941 and 1946. After leaving the army, he joined Miracle Records. He played on Sonny Thompson’s hit record “Long Gone” in 1948, and on its follow-up, “Late Freight”, credited to the Sonny Thompson Quintet featuring Eddie Chamblee. Both records reached no. 1 on the national Billboard R&B chart. Two follow-up records, “Blue Dreams” and “Back Street”, also made the R&B chart in 1949.
From 1947, he led his own band in Chicago clubs, as well as continuing to record with Thompson and on other sessions in Chicago, including The Four Blazes’ no. 1 R&B hit “Mary Jo” in 1952. In 1954 he joined Lionel Hampton’s band for two years, touring in Europe, before returning to lead his own group in Chicago. He accompanied both Amos Milburn and Lowell Fulson on some of their recordings, and then worked as accompanist to Dinah Washington on many of her successful recordings in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The two performed vocal duets in a style similar to that later adopted by Washington with Brook Benton, and were briefly married; he was her fifth husband. Chamblee also recorded for the Mercury and EmArcy labels, and with his own group in the early 1960s for the Roulette and Prestige labels.
In the 1970s he rejoined Hampton for tours of Europe, where he also played with Milt Buckner, and he recorded for the French Black & Blue label. He also performed with the Count Basie Orchestra in 1982, and from the 1980s until his death with the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band, as well as in clubs in New York City.
He died in New York in 1999 at the age of 79.

ekomsekom radio two #3

© Harry Gruyaert© Harry Gruyaert


1. Ahmad Jamal – Ahmad’s Blues // 00:00
2. Billie Holiday – All of Me // 02:53
3. Dizzy Gillespie – All The Things You Are // 05:52
4. Art Blakey – Along Came Bett // 08:41
5. Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong – Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off // 14:49
6. Julie London – Light My Fire // 19:00
7. Charles Mingus – Moanin’ // 21:56
8. Cannonball Adderley – Love For Sale // 29:51
9. Hank Mobley – Remember // 36:50
10. Horace Silver – Song For My Father (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) // 42:26
11. John Coltrane Quartet – Out Of This World // 49:40

Esperanza Spalding – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


The bassist and vocalist Esperanza Spalding conceived of Chamber Music Society as an intimate experience, a close musical exchange between a small group of friends. If it was intimacy she wanted, she got her wish: Performing three songs in the constraints of Bob Boilen’s workspace ensures that all of her supporting players were nice and cozy.

Set List:
“Little Fly”
“Midnight Sun”
“Apple Blossom”

Gil Evans – Las Vegas Tango


Ian Ernest Gilmore “Gil” Evans (May 13, 1912 – March 20, 1988) was a Canadian jazz pianist, arranger, composer and bandleader. He is widely recognized as one of the greatest orchestrators in jazz, playing an important role in the development of cool jazz, modal jazz, free jazz and jazz fusion. He is best known for his acclaimed collaborations with Miles Davis.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


Preservation Hall Jazz Band is a hot and historic outfit from New Orleans, and its members brought us a tuba-wielding Santa and some original holiday cheer and praise — what they call a Cajun Christmas from the French Quarter.

We lit some lights and decorated my desk and shelves as best we could, but it’s this amazing band — complete with saxophone, trombone, trumpet, drums and a couple of tubas — that lit this place up. We’ve never had so much dancing from the NPR crew at a Tiny Desk Concert. So enjoy the show, and happy holidays to all from NPR Music. –BOB BOILEN

Set List:
“Sugar Plum”
“I Think I Love You”
“Happy Holiday”
“Dear Lord”

Sinkane – Tiny Desk Concert


Sinkane opened its Tiny Desk Concert with a song that has been a bit of an anthem for me lately. “U’Huh” contains the Arabic phrase “kulu shi tamaam,” which translates to “everything’s great — it’s all going to be all right.”

Sinkane is the music of Ahmed Gallab — and such hopeful music it is. He grew up in London and has lived in Sudan and in Ohio and, these days, New York City. His band reflects his own love for music from around the world; you can hear a great New York jazz band in the rhythms of Sinkane, but you can also hear the influence of Bob Marley and the hypnotic repetition of Sudanese desert sounds.

Set List:
“U’Huh”
“Favorite Song”
“Deadweight”

ADHD – Full Performance


ADHD is an Icelandic band formed in 2007 known for their instrumental music, influenced by jazz and rock.
The band was formed to perform at the Höfn í Hornafirði blues-festival in 2007 and as the collaboration was successful the band decided to keep on performing. Their first album, ADHD was recorded and published in 2009 and won the title Icelandic Jazz Album of the Year at the Icelandic Music Awards. The albums ADHD2, ADHD3 and ADHD4 all have received nominations for the Nordic music prize.
ADHD’s albums are recorded live, to reflect the live performances of the band.

René Marie – NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


July 27, 2016 by PATRICK JARENWATTANANON • The Colorado River — better known for running through majestic National Parks and powering hydroelectric dams — forms an unlikely backdrop for the creation of a jazz song. But René Marie was answering phones at Denver’s jazz radio station KUVO when she sat down across from a fellow volunteer fundraiser. He would soon invite her on a canoeing trip and, without yet having seen the eponymous river, she wrote the giddy “Colorado River Song” on the way there.

René Marie’s is the sort of voice which first comes to mind when someone asks for a jazz singer — big and expressive, at home in classic swinging settings and comfortable in crowds. There’s plenty to set her apart, though. She made her first recording in her early 40s, so she’s a late bloomer by any standard. Her tastes admit many influences, and she’s got a penchant for original songwriting, especially where social justice intersects with personal biography. Her folky story-song “This Is (Not) A Protest Song” addresses homelessness and mental illness even in her own family.

Joined by her Experiment In Truth band (John Chin on piano, Elias Bailey on bass, Quentin Baxter on drums), Marie visited NPR headquarters to play songs from her new album Sound Of Red. She never specified the exact nature of that synesthetic idea, though the title track would seem to indicate that it’s about the addictive and lusty blood-rush of performing — of seeing red while singing the blues. In the audience was the bold KUVO volunteer from that day 10 years ago. His name is Jesse, and they’re now married and live in her home state of Virginia; they drove up together for this Tiny Desk concert.

Set List:
“Colorado River Song”
“This Is (Not) A Protest Song”
“Sound Of Red”